Groundhog Day and Keeping Connections

In the end, it’s our connections that count.

Phil Connors (played by Bill Murray) learned this in the 1993 film Groundhog Day. Some say Phil Connors must have spent more than 10 years reliving February 2. We know Phil became observant enough to catch a kid falling from a tree. And he developed an ear for music that let him jump into a jazz band and, of course, woo Rita (Andie MacDowell). In the end he came to appreciate the sounds and conversations of everyday life.

Phil learned the importance of connections, which appears to have saved to save him from decades spent reliving February 2.

Our primary connections come through hearing and talking—something we experience everyday but may take for granted. Hearing loss has the capacity to isolate because it hinders those connections. And since hearing loss is largely invisible, the lack of connection can be hard to identify, which only adds to the sense of isolation. While social media also help make connections, it is the people we encounter in real life that have the biggest impact.

Don’t jeopardize your vital connections by not paying attention to your hearing. Making small adjustments, like limiting your time using headphones or earbuds, can make a big difference over time.

Make maintaining your everyday connections a priority.

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